14 November 2016

The HeroQuest Quest : The First Goblin

'Allo Creepers -  Littleleadperson here!

In the latest instalment of the HeroQuest Hero Quest we have the most fearsome creature of all! Behold and despair for he will tear down your towns and eat your daughters - it is the horrific, the earth-shaking.....

Goblin

Let's be honest this little grunt would be lucky if he got to scrape the Barbarian before having his green arse flattened like a pancake.

To paint this little punk I followed some techniques I unearthed from the White Dwarf number 97. 





I've been poring over the 'Eavy Metal and Blanchitsu articles from those early days and the work of Richard Wright struck me with his very clean but subtle work. 



Following his methods as described by John Blanche in this edition of Blanchitsu I undercoated him white and mixed Goblin Green with Citadel Yellow Ink to give him his skin colour.

Then with a very thin brush tip I built up the colour and highlights by mixing in white layer by layer. I added blue ink to the mix to shade down in the crevices. Adding some black Nuln Oil to the mix i then shaded between the goblin flesh and other surfaces.

For his belt, boots and tunic I did much of the same with paint mixed with inks to create the light and shade. For the sword I also followed Wright's M.O. and this time covered it in a diluted layer of blue ink and adding more and more grey to the mix I applied a progressively lighter drybrushes.

I really enjoyed this technique - it brings out the detail early on and so the character of the figure is easily and quickly apparent.

Now on to the entry of everyone's favourite Frenchman JB !

14 comments:

  1. Even the humblest creature can look good with some little care. I have to say I didn't remember that article at all and really like the result. I'll sure have a proper look at it and try to apply it myself. Thanks for both the model and the tip !

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    1. Haven't not read the pre-100 WDs before hadn't realised how interesting and novel some of the modeling and painting tips are. One reader wrote in to advocate the merits of depicting armour by rubbing the graphite of a pencil on the miniature!

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    2. Graphite rubbing is a common technique for those who paint WW1 and 2 tanks. It's also the most accurate description for my strange sexual obsession with 2B pencils.

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  2. Really interesting to see the results of a classic painting tutorial. I really like the vibrant results, excellent stuff!

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  3. Great job on him. Quite an intriguing paint style, the sword is painted in quite a novel manner. I shall have to check out that article. I note that his colours go nicely with the dungeon interior design. :)

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    1. I consider the sword technique a cheap and cheerful version of non-metallics metal!

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  4. I'm a big fan of that little goblin. Those minis are great, so much devious character in the most humble of Heroquest miniatures. Jolly good show there!

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    1. Thanks! He does look like he's about to really enjoy prodding someone with that there sword

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  5. That's lovely, well done.

    The preference for acid greenskins so far is something that I would not have predicted (although I am keen on it myself).

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    1. The lighting brought out the 'acidity' although in real life it is still far away from the dark and dirty.

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  6. Excellent! I love the bright green skin :)

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  7. Nice work on that little guy. There's some gold in them thar old tutorials.

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  8. Ahhh, who still pines for the dark days when the painting instructions were written as slabs of text on black-and-white pages with no accompanying stage photos.

    Great work on the goblin!

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